Frequently Asked Questions

How much does it cost to hire you?

My prices are very competitive, AND I tailor packages for each client so you only pay for what you need.

Why should I hire an Immigration Attorney?

The laws of immigration are extremely complex and not every individual has the same immigration history. Allowing an immigration attorney to represent you in your case will give you peace of mind, as the immigration attorney will ensure that you are correctly following all procedures as they relate to your specific case.

We pride ourselves on providing solid and affordable immigration representation. Throughout the processing of your case, we make it a priority to keep you involved and informed, and personally guide you in making important decisions about your case.

I received a Request for Evidence (RFE) from the government. Can you help me to respond to their request?

It is very important that all Requests for Evidence (RFE) from the government be responded to in a timely manner with the appropriate information and evidence. Our experienced immigration attorney has successfully responded to RFEs from the government by preparing and presenting the response in compliance with the government’s standards. We would be happy to set up a consultation with you to determine the best course of action for the response.

I received a Notice of Intent to Deny (NOID) from the government. Can you help me to respond to this notice?

At times, the government may incorrectly conclude that an immigration case is deniable. However, our experienced attorney has successfully resolved cases where the government considered denying the case. Results may vary depending upon the specific facts of each individual’s case, and there are circumstances where not every case can be resolved with a simple response. A consultation with an immigration attorney will help you determine whether a response to your NOID is the best option, or whether it is best for you to pursue another avenue of relief.

Click or call 772-236-0148 for an initial consultation

What is a green card?

A green card, also referred to as a “Lawful Permanent Resident” card, is a card that serves as proof of lawful U.S. residency. A green card allows you to permanently live and work in the U.S. so long as your Lawful Permanent Resident status remains valid. A green card is typically valid for either 2- or 10- years, and must be renewed upon the card’s expiration. There are many ways that you can obtain a green card, including through family, employment, investments, or other means.

Is being a lawful permanent resident the same as being a U.S. citizen?

It is very important to note that being a Lawful Permanent Resident is NOT the same as being a U.S. citizen. While being a lawful permanent resident allows you to remain permanently in the U.S., your status can be revoked by the U.S. government if you’ve committed certain acts that violate your status. U.S. citizenship, on the other hand, is a permanent grant of citizenship status which cannot be revoked, unless, for example, it was determined that you gained citizenship through fraudulent means.

How long does the green card process take?

The timeframe for a green card application depends on the nature of the petition (i.e., family-based, employment-based, investment-based, etc.). Typically, the green card process can take anywhere from 1-3 years. In some cases, for example, when obtaining a green card based on a sibling relationship or based on the country that you are immigrating from, the process can take anywhere from 10-15 years.

I would like to help my family member immigrate to the United States. What options are available?

The most common way to immigrate to the U.S. is through a family-based green card petition. Generally speaking, qualified family members who are spouses, parents, children, or siblings of the potential immigrant can help that person come to the U.S. by petitioning for their green card. A consultation with an immigration attorney will help you determine the best immigration option for you and your family member.

Click or call 772-236-0148 for an initial consultation

How long does it take to become a U.S. citizen?

Generally, a person must have been a Lawful Permanent Resident for 5 years in order to apply for U.S. citizenship (or 3 years if based upon marriage to a U.S. Citizen). The citizenship application process, also known as Naturalization, can take anywhere from 8-12 months after filing the application. Contact an immigration attorney to determine whether you are eligible to apply for U.S. citizenship and to formulate the best strategy for your unique case moving forward.

I have a criminal record. Can I still apply for U.S. citizenship?

Many green card holders who are ready to apply for U.S. Citizenship are concerned about their applications being denied based on a prior criminal charge or arrest. That is because, in order to qualify for U.S. Citizenship through the Naturalization process, the law requires that you establish that you have been and continue to be “an individual of good moral character.”

If you have been convicted of breaking the law, the USCIS can consider that incident in deciding whether or not to approve or deny your application based on the “good moral character” grounds. In many cases, it is difficult to predict in advance how the USCIS will react to your criminal record. Under these circumstances, it is highly recommended to consult with an experienced Immigration Attorney.

Click or call 772-236-0148 for an initial consultation

What types of visas can you help with?

What is the difference between a non-immigrant visa and an immigrant visa?

When filing an immigrant petition, the applicant is requesting a grant of Lawful Permanent Residency in the United States. If approved, the applicant will typically receive a green card and be permitted to live and work in the U.S. permanently, so long as their Lawful Permanent Resident status remains valid.

On the other hand, a non-immigrant petition is filed to request temporary status in the United States (usually based upon employment, temporary travel for vacation or medical reasons, or to pursue educational studies in the U.S.)

Click or call 772-236-0148 for an initial consultation

How much does it cost to hire you?

My prices are very competitive, AND I tailor packages for each client so you only pay for what you need.

Why should I hire an Immigration Attorney?

The laws of immigration are extremely complex and not every individual has the same immigration history. Allowing an immigration attorney to represent you in your case will give you peace of mind, as the immigration attorney will ensure that you are correctly following all procedures as they relate to your specific case.

We pride ourselves on providing solid and affordable immigration representation. Throughout the processing of your case, we make it a priority to keep you involved and informed, and personally guide you in making important decisions about your case.

I received a Request for Evidence (RFE) from the government. Can you help me to respond to their request?

It is very important that all Requests for Evidence (RFE) from the government be responded to in a timely manner with the appropriate information and evidence. Our experienced immigration attorney has successfully responded to RFEs from the government by preparing and presenting the response in compliance with the government’s standards. We would be happy to set up a consultation with you to determine the best course of action for the response.

I received a Notice of Intent to Deny (NOID) from the government. Can you help me to respond to this notice?

At times, the government may incorrectly conclude that an immigration case is deniable. However, our experienced attorney has successfully resolved cases where the government considered denying the case. Results may vary depending upon the specific facts of each individual’s case, and there are circumstances where not every case can be resolved with a simple response. A consultation with an immigration attorney will help you determine whether a response to your NOID is the best option, or whether it is best for you to pursue another avenue of relief.

Click or call 772-236-0148 for an initial consultation

What is a green card?

A green card, also referred to as a “Lawful Permanent Resident” card, is a card that serves as proof of lawful U.S. residency. A green card allows you to permanently live and work in the U.S. so long as your Lawful Permanent Resident status remains valid. A green card is typically valid for either 2- or 10- years, and must be renewed upon the card’s expiration. There are many ways that you can obtain a green card, including through family, employment, investments, or other means.

Is being a lawful permanent resident the same as being a U.S. citizen?

It is very important to note that being a Lawful Permanent Resident is NOT the same as being a U.S. citizen. While being a lawful permanent resident allows you to remain permanently in the U.S., your status can be revoked by the U.S. government if you’ve committed certain acts that violate your status. U.S. citizenship, on the other hand, is a permanent grant of citizenship status which cannot be revoked, unless, for example, it was determined that you gained citizenship through fraudulent means.

How long does the green card process take?

The timeframe for a green card application depends on the nature of the petition (i.e., family-based, employment-based, investment-based, etc.). Typically, the green card process can take anywhere from 1-3 years. In some cases, for example, when obtaining a green card based on a sibling relationship or based on the country that you are immigrating from, the process can take anywhere from 10-15 years.

I would like to help my family member immigrate to the United States. What options are available?

The most common way to immigrate to the U.S. is through a family-based green card petition. Generally speaking, qualified family members who are spouses, parents, children, or siblings of the potential immigrant can help that person come to the U.S. by petitioning for their green card. A consultation with an immigration attorney will help you determine the best immigration option for you and your family member.

Click or call 772-236-0148 for an initial consultation

How long does it take to become a U.S. citizen?

Generally, a person must have been a Lawful Permanent Resident for 5 years in order to apply for U.S. citizenship (or 3 years if based upon marriage to a U.S. Citizen). The citizenship application process, also known as Naturalization, can take anywhere from 8-12 months after filing the application. Contact an immigration attorney to determine whether you are eligible to apply for U.S. citizenship and to formulate the best strategy for your unique case moving forward.

I have a criminal record. Can I still apply for U.S. citizenship?

Many green card holders who are ready to apply for U.S. Citizenship are concerned about their applications being denied based on a prior criminal charge or arrest. That is because, in order to qualify for U.S. Citizenship through the Naturalization process, the law requires that you establish that you have been and continue to be “an individual of good moral character.”

If you have been convicted of breaking the law, the USCIS can consider that incident in deciding whether or not to approve or deny your application based on the “good moral character” grounds. In many cases, it is difficult to predict in advance how the USCIS will react to your criminal record. Under these circumstances, it is highly recommended to consult with an experienced Immigration Attorney.

Click or call 772-236-0148 for an initial consultation

What types of visas can you help with?

What is the difference between a non-immigrant visa and an immigrant visa?

When filing an immigrant petition, the applicant is requesting a grant of Lawful Permanent Residency in the United States. If approved, the applicant will typically receive a green card and be permitted to live and work in the U.S. permanently, so long as their Lawful Permanent Resident status remains valid.

On the other hand, a non-immigrant petition is filed to request temporary status in the United States (usually based upon employment, temporary travel for vacation or medical reasons, or to pursue educational studies in the U.S.)

Click or call 772-236-0148 for an initial consultation

How to get started:

Step One:

Click or call 772-236-0148 for an initial consultation

Step Two:

We’ll conduct a thorough screening to get a better understanding of your situation and, if we decide to work together, discuss your options for moving forward

Step Three:

We’ll roll up our sleeves and get to work on your case

I can't stress enough how helpful Olivia was with my green card process. Not only did she help my husband and I with all the documents needed, but she was always answering my questions, guiding us, and always so responsive. I definitely recommend Olivia as your attorney if you want a smooth and positive process.”

~ Agetina Z.
Attorney olivia cummings - florida immigration attorney

Clients come to me from all types of background and walks of life.

But my job is not to pass judgement on what’s happened in your past — my job is to help you get one step closer to your dreams for the future.

My promise to you: To not just listen to your story, but to truly HEAR your story in order to provide you with the compassionate representation that you deserve.

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